Tempe Estate Planning Lawyers

With My AZ Lawyers

CONTACT YOUR TEMPE ESTATE PLANNING LEGAL TEAM

Most people want to be sure that when they pass away, their affairs are in order and there is as little stress and dispute for family members as possible. You can achieve this by creating a valid and strategic estate plan. Our Tempe Estate Planning Lawyers can assist you in getting your affairs and estate in order. Our Lawyers service clients in Tempe, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Queen Creek, Apache Junction, and all other communities in the East Valley of Phoenix, Arizona.

TEMPE ESTATE PLANNING LAWYER

Depending on your circumstances, some combination of a last will and testament, revocable and irrevocable trusts, and other methods of transfer will be the most effective way to pass down your assets. You can also use your estate plan to prepare your family for medical conditions that take away your ability to complete business transactions and make your own treatment decisions. Advanced health directives and powers of attorney can make your wishes clear and eliminate confusion among your loved ones if you ever lose your legal capacity. But with all of the factors that go into making an estate plan, it can be extremely daunting to go it on your own.

CHANGING YOUR ESTATE PLAN FOR DIFFERENT PHASES OF LIFE

Most people want to be sure that when they pass away, their affairs are in order and there is as little stress and dispute for family members as possible. You can achieve this by creating a valid and strategic estate plan. Our Tempe Estate Planning Attorneys can assist you in getting your affairs and estate in order. We service clients in Tempe, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Queen Creek, Apache Junction, and all other communities in the East Valley of Phoenix, Arizona.
  • Young Adult, or about 18-25

    Even if you haven’t had children or acquired property yet, it doesn’t mean that it’s too early to create your estate plan. Accidents that would trigger a power of attorney or a living will can happen at any time. Having these in place early can also reduce the amount of estate planning you have to do when you start your own family and build your estate. 

  • Growing Family and Assets, or about 35-50

    At this point in life, many people have become more established and have significant value in their estates. You may want to consider creating a living trust to protect and maintain your assets. 

  • Young Family, or about 25-35

    As you get older, you may pay off your car, put a down payment on a house, get married, and maybe even have children. You may want to strategize to protect your children’s futures, and prepare for any other unforeseeable life circumstances. 

  • Preparing for Retirement, or about 50-65

    Now is the time to structure your wealth so that it can support you after you quit working. If you have children, they may be reaching adulthood and needing different kinds of support. If you haven’t already created an estate plan by this point, you should at least create your last will and testament, although using multiple instruments will usually help you get the most out of your estate. 

  • Senior Years, or about 65+

    While you’ve undoubtedly earned the right to enjoy your retirement, you will also need to make sure you have funds available for long term care and any other expenses that are specific to your family. Having a valid power of attorney and Medicaid documents in place is crucial in this time period. You probably will need to update your estate plan if you’ve already created one to reflect new family members, as well as those you have lost. 

LIVING WILL

A Living Will is one of the most common forms of advanced health directives. Other common types include POLST, or Physician Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment, and DNR, or do not resuscitate, orders. You can also use a health care power of attorney to give someone the responsibility to make these types of decisions.

In a perfect world, no one would ever need to rely on your living will. But if you ever lose the ability to give your own informed consent for medical treatment, your doctors will follow any instructions you have laid out in advanced directives. For example, you could end up in a coma, or lose the requisite legal capacity to make decisions with a progressive disease like Alzheimer’s or dementia. When this happens, a living will lets your doctors know how you’d like to proceed under certain circumstances. 

PREPARE FOR THE WORST WITH A LIVING WILL

You can include a wide variety of medical decisions in your living will. Living wills are best known for indicating whether or not a person would like to be kept on life support if they are in a persistent vegetative state. Additionally, you can also decide whether you would like to receive dialysis, medications, and palliative care. Many people will include a provision in their living wills that they would not like to be taken to the hospital in a medical emergency. You can also indicate if you would like to be an organ donor in your living will. 

LIVING WILL REVOCATION

As life changes, your beliefs and wishes about medical treatments may change as well. When this happens, you may need to revoke, or cancel, your living will and other advanced directives. You can revoke your living will by destroying it, which Arizona views as a revocatory act. Another way to revoke a living will is by creating a new living will that is “materially inconsistent” with your first living will. You can even announce that your new living will is meant to replace the previous one. Make sure your living will, as well as any future necessary revocations, are completed correctly with our dedicated Arizona estate planning team. 

POWERS OF ATTORNEY

You can make some medical decisions in advance with your living will, but what about the rest of your affairs? If you are ever in a coma, or are otherwise legally incapacitated as to decision-making, an Arizona durable power of attorney would go into effect. 

The person you choose for your power of attorney, also called your representative or agent, should clearly be someone that you can trust. Never hesitate to contact an attorney at our law office who is experienced in Arizona estate planning law. Schedule a free consultation to get your questions answered regarding your specific estate planning needs. My Arizona Lawyers understands what clients in Arizona need and expect from an estate planning law firm. Our Tempe Estate Planning Lawyers and Arizona Will Attorneys are top-rated, and our legal team is professional and dedicated to providing the best legal service in Arizona.

KEEP YOUR AFFAIRS IN ORDER WITH POWERS OF ATTORNEY

You can give your representative many responsibilities with a general power of attorney, which extends to decisions about business, finance, etc. This can last as long as you like, and can be revoked at any time you have the requisite mental capacity. You should consider having an alternate named in your general power of attorney in case your first choice is unable to fulfill their duties. 

Special Power of Attorney 

Tempe Power of Attorney Lawyers

Maybe you only want someone to complete an important transaction on your behalf on a one time basis. If so, you should use a special power of attorney. This type of power of attorney can be useful in more situations than you being in a coma. Let’s say that you are on an extended trip out of the country and want to transfer the title of your vehicle to one of your children. You could also use a special power of attorney if you are expecting to be deployed or incarcerated. For more information about how to give someone the authority to complete a one-time transaction on your behalf, call 480-833-8000 to speak to our Tempe estate planning lawyers

If you want someone to make your health care decisions for you, you can indicate who should make those decisions with a health care power of attorney. It can also be used for mental health care matters. This can be used in conjunction with your advanced directives. 

Your chosen power of attorney could predecease you, or you could have a falling out with them. When this happens, you will need to revoke any applicable powers of attorney. Your revocation needs to be executed properly, and communicated to all involved parties so they know how to proceed if you ever lose your legal capacity. Our Tempe estate planning attorneys can help you revoke and replace your powers of attorney as necessary at an affordable price. 

CONTACT US

My AZ Lawyers logo
Get Directions
[email protected]