Arizona Personal Injury Laws

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My AZ Lawyers Personal Injury attorneys know the Arizona Personal Injury laws.  They have full knowledge of which laws apply in cases of injury or accident in Arizona.

Arizona Statute of Limitations on Injury Lawsuits

Arizona does have time limits on injury lawsuits.  A law known as the “statute of limitations” sets a limit of time to bring an injury case to the court.  Any case that is filed in court after an injury or an accident is affected by this statute.  To file a lawsuit in relation to a personal injury in Arizona, a person has two years.  Typically, the two year period is from the time of the accident.  Sometimes injuries aren’t discovered until after the accident, so it is possible that the time limit may start later than the date of the accident.

Auto Insurance Laws In Arizona

Arizona uses an at-fault system when determining how to handle vehicle injury and accident cases.  Having auto insurance is a mandate in the state of Arizona.  Individuals driving in Arizona without insurance are subject to penalty as they are breaking the law.  Arizona Auto Insurance Laws do offer some room for negotiations in settlement for the driver found at fault. 

Arizona does have a mandatory amount of insurance required for individuals driving in AZ.  The mandatory insurance applies to all vehicles including (but not limited to): motorcycles, ATV’s, mopeds, and golf carts.  There are absolute minimum levels of mandated coverage for Arizona drivers.  These insurance minimums are:  $10,000 in property damage liability.  Bodily injury damages for one (1) person is $15,000 and for two (2) people or more the liability limit is $30,000.  

Arizona Dog Bite Rules

Arizona has specific statues that make a dog owner “strictly liable” if their dog injures someone. Regardless of any past behavior of the animal, a dog owner is responsible for any personal injury caused by the dog.  In other states, dog owners are protected from liability somewhat and to some degree.  Arizona has a “strict” liability law for dog bites or attack cases.

Arizona Damage Caps

Arizona does not have any caps on damages in personal injury cases.  Many states  limit the amount of compensation an injured person can receive in specific cases.  This “damage cap” usually applies for certain types of injury or harm, and is different depending on the state.

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ARIZONA PERSONAL INJURY FAQs

FREquently asked questions about arizona personal injury

Your Arizona Accident Lawyers answer many of the frequently asked questions regarding Accident and Personal Injury Laws in Arizona. Contact our experienced Injury Attorneys with any further questions.

ANSWER:

If you are injured in an accident, you may want to consider speaking to a personal injury attorney. The consequences of an accident can have lasting effects on the lives of you and your family. You can be compensated for both your physical and financial damages after an accident.

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ANSWER:

Your case will be valued by totaling your damages resulting from the accident. There are several types of damages, many that you may not even think of, and some must be calculated for the future. For example, the injuries from your accident may require lifelong medical care. You will need to address all expenses, current and future, in your personal injury claim – you won’t have the option to request additional compensation from the defendant once your case is completed.

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ANSWER:

Personal injury awards are divided into punitive damages and compensatory damages. Punitive damages are a penalty meant to punish the defendant for unethical behavior, and can only be awarded at trial. Compensatory damages, however, can be obtained through either a trial award or a settlement agreement. There are two types of compensatory damages in Arizona personal injury cases: special damages and general damages.

Special damages are your out-of-pocket expenses that can be clearly calculated. Examples include medical bills, lost wages, alternative child care, transportation to and from doctor’s appointments, and more. These can vary on a case-by-case basis, as some expenses won’t be applicable to some families and after certain injuries.

The value of general damages isn’t so easily ascertained. These are noneconomic damages, like emotional distress, loss of consortium, and pain and suffering. Emotional distress is the mental pain and trauma you may feel after an accident, and can be inflicted intentionally or negligently. It is often included as part of pain and suffering. Loss of consortium or companionship represents the damage to your relationships from your injury, including the inability to be intimate with your significant other.

Many types of general damages are often thrown into one category known as pain and suffering. Pain and suffering can represent both the physical and mental trauma you may experience from an accident. The most common way pain and suffering is calculated in Arizona is with the multiplier method. Your special damages will be totaled and multiplied by a number between one and five. The more serious the injuries, or the more negligent the defendant’s conduct, the higher the multiplier used will be. Your personal injury attorney will assist you by negotiating for a higher multiplier to be used, meaning a higher final award for you.

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ANSWER:

Personal injury is a type of tort, or a civil case where one party seeks compensation for their damages after an accident. Common types of personal injury cases include car accidents, slip and falls, and dog bites.

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ANSWER:

Arizona is a comparative negligence state, meaning that your damages will be reduced based on how much percent you were at fault for the accident. You can seek compensation for 1% of your damages even if you were 99% at fault for the accident. Your personal injury will advocate to keep your assigned fault percentage as low as possible.

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ANSWER:

The first thing you should do after any type of accident is make sure that you are safe, and attend to any immediate medical needs. You may want to call the police to the scene, depending on what type of accident it was. A police report can be a vital piece of evidence in your potential personal injury claim. You should exchange information with all involved parties, and get their insurance information, if possible. There may be an existing auto, homeowner’s, or business insurance policy that will cover your damages after an accident. Get the names and contact information of any witnesses to the event as well. Take pictures and video of the scene, and collect any other available evidence. Whenever possible, consult with a personal injury attorney before speaking with either side’s insurance company.

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ANSWER:

You have a few options on what to do about your medical bills while your personal injury claim is being resolved. If you are able to pay your medical bills yourself, you will be compensated directly in your personal injury claim. Your health insurance company may also seek compensation for their contributions, which is known as subrogation. You may have Med-Pay through your auto insurance policy, which pays your medical expenses after an accident regardless of who was at fault. If none of these options are available to you, you may receive treatment through medical liens. Medical liens are used when there is a personal injury claim pending. Your doctors will be compensated out of your final award.

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ANSWER:

A statute of limitations is the time frame in which you must file your lawsuit. If your lawsuit isn’t filed within the applicable statute of limitations, it will be dismissed. Statutes of limitations vary by state, so you don’t assume the same rules will apply to you that applied to your friend who was injured in another state.

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ANSWER:

For most personal injury claims in Arizona, the statute of limitations is 2 years from the date of the injury. However, there are exceptions. For example, the statute of limitations is reduced to one year if the defendant is a city or state government.

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ANSWER:

Personal injury attorneys, in general, don’t take payment up front. Instead, they receive an agreed-upon percentage of your final award, whether it’s achieved through settlement or trial. Personal injury attorneys can vary in how much of a contingency fee they charge. Many attorneys will charge up to 33% or more for your case. However, the attorneys at My AZ Lawyers instead charge a guaranteed 25% of your final award. See the difference our attorneys can make by getting started with your free consultation today.

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