If you participate in society in any sort of way, you’re probably aware that due to the spread of COVID-19, people have been stockpiling household goods such as soap and toilet paper. Some Americans truly don’t have a square to spare, not even a ply.  All of this hoarding in conjunction with an increasing unemployment rate means that an increase in crime and criminal activity may not be far behind
For instance, on April 6, 2020, a 26-year-old California man was arrested and charged with battery after a dispute with his mother over toilet paper. The mother had been hiding toilet paper as she thought he was using too much, and when he confronted her, it escalated to violence. The mother is fine and that district experienced their first call over a toilet paper dispute.
Battery is a charge often confused with assault. Assault is causing reasonable fear of imminent bodily harm, while battery is actually causing said bodily harm. A lot of times assault and battery go hand in hand.  Both are against the law and simple battery or simple assault are usually just misdemeanors.  Unfortunately, many many times the situation escalates and often the battery is delivered via an object or weapon and then the charges and the penalties escalate as well.

In Arizona, battery is referred to as an aggravated assault. This sentence can be increased by how seriously the victim is harmed, the aggressor’s prior record, use of a deadly weapon, or if the victim is a public servant. Jail time starts at 30 days if there are no aggravating factors. There will also be potential fines and classes.

If you are losing your mind being quarantined with your family, please try your best to not punch your mom over toilet paper. Thus, if you are arrested and face criminal charges, you need to discuss your case and options with an attorney. Our office offers free consultations over the phone to accommodate our clients while shelter-in-place orders are in effect.

2020-04-10T02:42:28+00:00 April 10th, 2020|Uncategorized|

Categories